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salt marsh

mouse@bookwyrm.social

Joined 7 months ago

it's me, I'm the creator and admin of BookWyrm

salt marsh's books

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2021 Reading Goal

59% complete! salt marsh has read 31 of 52 books.

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The Filter Bubble (2011, Penguin Press)
4 star

"An eye-opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling-and …

Nearly all geek cultures are structured as an empire of clever wherein ingenuity, not charisma, is king. The intrinsic efficiency of a creation is more important than how it looks. Geek cultures are data driven and reality based, valuing substance over style.

The Filter Bubble by

next you're going to tell me a cis white guy wrote this

The Filter Bubble (2011, Penguin Press)
4 star

"An eye-opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling-and …

This book keeps starting chapters with long anecdotes about things like a Soviet spy defecting, or how adderall works, which do not explain anything about how computers work, and then basing broad statements about how computers effect the brain on them

The Filter Bubble (2011, Penguin Press)
4 star

"An eye-opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling-and …

In 2006, Facebook users posted literally billions of updates -- philosophical quotes, tidbits about who they were dating, what was for breakfast.

The Filter Bubble by

I'm incredibly grateful to Lurking for pointing out that it's always breakfast in these quotes

The Filter Bubble (2011, Penguin Press)
4 star

"An eye-opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling-and …

Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon.com, was one of the first people to realize that you could harness the power of relevance to make a few billion dollars.

The Filter Bubble by

I would argue that recommendation algorithms pale in comparison to monopolistic business practices, labor exploitation, and corporate tax evasion in the role it plays in making Bezos a billionaire.

The Filter Bubble (2011, Penguin Press)
4 star

"An eye-opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling-and …

...at this point, Netflix can predict how much you'll like a given movie within about half a star.

The Filter Bubble by

I'm curious where this conclusion comes from? The wording makes the claim a little nonsensical, but it sounds like it's based on actually metrics about how people (in 2011) responded to netflix's recs? But there must be an unstated assumption here about how much prior use the user has on which the recommendation is made.

I also wonder how well this holds up today, when streaming video is so fragmented. Netflix has basically none of the movies I like on it, so it does a very poor job if recommending them to me.